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New Haggadah Keeps It Simple

LUBAVITCH HEADQUARTERS, NY

The Kehot Publication Society, the Lubavitch publishing house, has announced the publication of the new, Haggadah For Pesach–Annotated Edition.

The attractively designed, user-friendly Haggadah follows the innovations included in the highly acclaimed Annotated editions of the Siddur and Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur Machzorim.

For those conducting or participating in a Seder for the first time, the elaborate observances of the evening can be daunting. “With clarity and simplicity in mind, the new annotated edition is the perfect solution for family and communal Seders,” says Rabbi Yosef B. Friedman, director of Kehot.

Other Passover Haggadahs (with English translation) published by Kehot include the Haggadah For Pesach With an Anthology of Reasons and Customs, Compiled by the Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson; Passover Haggadah With Insights Adapted from the Teachings of the Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson, and the Zalman Kleinman Art Haggadah.

Of special interest, is the exquisite, facsimile reproduction of the 1760 illuminated Kittsee Haggadah. The original, only-copy, of this unique Haggadah is housed at the Central Lubavitch Library, at Lubavitch Headquarters in New York.

To view the entire selection of Haggadahs, as well as a complete line of Passover publications, visit kehotonline.

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