Sunday, / September 19, 2021
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Today in Jewish History: 10 (Yud) Shevat

Yud Shvat is the anniversary of the passing of Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn, sixth Rebbe of Lubavitch, of blessed memory, (5710/1950). On the same day, one year later, his son-in-law, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson, assumed the mantle of leadership of Chabad.

During a farbrengen–a Chasidic gathering that evening, the Rebbe delivered his inaugural discourse titled Bati Legani— “Enter my Garden,” marking his official acceptance of the position of Rebbe. 

 

He also made a statement establishing his “agenda” as Rebbe of Chabad. Freely translated it reads in part, “If you see a person who has love of G‑d but lacks love of Torah and love of his fellow, you must tell him that his love of G‑d is incomplete. And if you see a person who has only love for his fellow, you must strive to bring him to love of Torah and love of G‑d—so that his love toward his fellows should not only be expressed in providing bread for the hungry and water for the thirsty, but also to bring them close to Torah and to G‑d.”

Yud Shevat begins tonight (Jan. 23) at sundown and lasts through to tomorrow night. The day is marked by Torah study, Chasidic gatherings and reaffirmation to the Rebbe’s mission as articulated above.

 

Events around the world will celebrate the 70th year of the Rebbe’s vision.

To learn more about the Rebbe, visit Rebbe.org.

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